Journal of Law and Mobility

The Journal of Law and Mobility are a resource for scholarship, analysis, and information concerning law connected and automated vehicles and new mobility concepts. An online-only publication, the Journal accepts submissions of short scholarly works (usually between 2,000-6,000 words, footnotes inclusive) as well as shorter blog posts. All submissions are reviewed before publication  by members of our Editorial Board, with help from our student Research Editors. For more information and derails on how to submit your piece for our consideration, visit our submissions page.

Exceptional Driving Principles For Autonomous Vehicles

By: A. D’Amato, S. Dancel, J. Pilutti, L. Tellis, E. Frascaroli, AND J.C.Gerdes Cite as: A. D’Amato et al., Exceptional Driving Principles for Autonomous Vehicles, 2022 J. L. & Mob. 2. Download Full Article Here I.    Abstract Public expectations for automated vehicles span a broad range, from mobility for passengers, to road user safety,

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Data Governance Frameworks for Smart Cities: Key Considerations for Data Management and Use

By: Jennifer Johnson, Anna Hevia, and Rebecca Yergin, with contributions from Shayan Karbassi, Adira Levine, and Jorge Ortiz. Cite as: Jennifer Johnson et al., Data Governance Frameworks for Smart Cities: Key Considerations for Data Management and Use, 2022 J. L. & Mob. 1. Download Full Article Here I.              Introduction The proliferation of “smart technologies” has created significant

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Mobile-Based Transportation Companies, Mandatory Arbitration, and the Americans with Disabilities Act

By Tamar Meshel† Cite as: Tamar Meshel, Mobile-Based Transportation Companies, Mandatory Arbitration, and the Americans with Disabilities Act, 2021 J. L. & Mob. 1. Download Full Article Uber, Lyft, DoorDash and similar mobile-based transportation network companies (TNCs) have been involved in numerous legal battles in multiple jurisdictions. One contested issue concerns whether TNC drivers are

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The Relationship Between Social Innovation and Active Mobility Public Services

This article aims to discuss the relationship between social innovation and public services on active mobility. Two active mobility initiatives are considered in the city of São Paulo, and analyzed based on 11 variables that characterize social innovation. Through the mapping of recent Brazilian regulatory frameworks for active mobility and a low-carbon economy, we can propose the following relationship: the more local (municipal) the public policy, the greater its social influence and participation. However, despite the advances indicated by both experiences of active mobility analyzed (highlighting the role of organized civil society), and by the progress in the regulatory framework, until now innovative practices in the local context have been restricted to the treatment of pedestrian spaces. Therefore, there exists a great potential for the continued introduction of innovations in the improvement and scale of public services for pedestrian mobility, following the paradigm of sustainable urban mobility, and based on social participation.

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Who Gets to Operate on Herbie? Right to Repair Legislation in the Context of Automated Vehicles

By Jennifer J. Huseby
You bought it, you own it, but do you have the right to repair it? As right-to-repair remains a hot topic in the context of consumer electronics such as smartphones, one must consider the ramifications it may have for the automated vehicle (“AV”) industry. As the backdrop for one of the first legislative victories for right-to-repair, the automobile industry has continued to push for the expansion of right-to-repair to cover increased access to telematics and exceptions to proprietary software controls. However, as we revisit the issue for more highly connected and automated vehicles, it is important to assess the unique considerations of the AV sector before we can transpose previously learned lessons into a new, nearly unpredictable context.

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Expanding and Modernizing Rail Infrastructure

       The railway is a part of the American ethos. Without rivers to carry us from one end of the country to another, and with horses unable to travel coast to coast, the railway was king. By 1860 there were 30,000 miles of railway crisscrossing the country. By 1915 the number had risen to over a quarter

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Potential Solutions to the First Mile/Last Mile Problem

     Public transportation usage suffers from a variety of issues that decrease the number of potential riders that ultimately choose an alternative form of transportation to get to their destination. One of these challenges, known as the First Mile/Last Mile (FM/LM) problem, is the requirement of the rider to get from the starting point of

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Are Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles a Practical, Ethical, and Sustainable option?

The environmental impacts of the transportation industry have been at the forefront of mobility discourse for the last decade. With 27% of greenhouse gas emissions coming from transportation and a significant percentage of low-income households’ total earnings going to transportation (over 30% in some instances), the need to significantly reduce the amount of vehicle emissions

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An Automated Driving Issue Spotter

The following hypothetical situation was written by University of Michigan Law School student Joe Hillman. This blog post is to serve as an issue spotter with which our readers should please feel free to engage. Comments or subsequent blog post submissions regarding this issue spotter may address any relevant type of law or policy. Imagine

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A Story of Two Transportation Projects: India’s Bullet Train and Sri Lanka’s Port

Two infrastructure projects in South Asia were built on the promises of East Asian trading partners and on extensive lines of credit. Though both are characterized by extensive delays, why is one celebrated as an important step forward towards infrastructure modernization, and the other derided as “debt-trap diplomacy”? In Gujarat, India’s preparations for a high-speed

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