Blog

Through the Woods: A Thanksgiving Round Up of Mobility Innovations

In the U.S., Thanksgiving represents the busiest travel period of the year, with AAA predicting that this year 54 million people will travel 50 miles or more before sitting down for turkey and stuffing. So how will CAVs and other mobility innovations change how we travel, not just at Thanksgiving, but yearlong? Lets take a look

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CAVs and the Traffic Stop

The traffic stop has long been a primary point of interaction between police and the community. As consent Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations into local police departments in Ferguson, Baltimore, and Chicago made clear in recent years, they are also a moment that is open to large-scale abuse. The rise of connected and autonomous vehicles

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CAVs, Big Data, and the Future of Urban Design

City design has long been shaped by modes of transportation. The transition is easy to spot as you move westward across America. Relatively compact eastern cities initially grew up in the 18th and 19th centuries, when people traveled by foot or by horse. Scattered across the plains, and particularly throughout the vast expanses of Texas

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How Will CAVs Change the Shape of Our Cities?

The rapidly approaching deployment of commercially available CAVs has led city planners to begin grappling with the ways in which this new technology is expected to shape our built environment.  A 2017 report from MIT’s Urban Economics Lab and Center for Real Estate, financed by Capital One, explores potential real estate changes driven by CAVs.

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What Recent Stories on Google and GM Data Collection Mean for CAVs

Two recent news stories build interestingly on my recent blog post about CAVs and privacy. The first, from Forbes, detailing law enforcement use of “reverse location” orders, where by investigators can obtain from Google information on all Google users in a given location at a given time. This would allow, for example, police to obtain

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Arizona’s Regulatory Approach to be Tested as Waymo Prepares for Commercial Rollout of CAVs

By the end of this year, Alphabet subsidiary Waymo plans to launch one of the nation’s first commercial driverless taxi services in Phoenix, Arizona. As preparations move forward, there has been increasing attention focused on Arizona’s regulatory scheme regarding connected and automated vehicles (CAVs), and the ongoing debate over whether and how their deployment should

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CAVs and the New Push for Privacy Regulation

For many people, syncing their phone to their car is a convenience – allowing them to make hands-free calls or connect to media on their phone through the car’s infotainment system. But doing so can leave a lot of data on the car’s hardware, even after a user believes they have deleted such data. That

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Will the Automated Vehicle Revolution be Green?

Last week’s release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report highlights the “rapid and far-reaching” societal transformations required in order to limit warming to 1.5, or even 2 degrees Celsius. A new study by researchers at the University of Michigan, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, highlights the role of

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Getting on the Road

Hello! My name is Ian Williams, and I am the Managing Editor of the Journal of Law and Mobility. I wanted to take a moment to introduce myself, and give a brief preview of what to expect from the Journal in the coming weeks and months. As Managing Editor my job is to keep the

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Waymo’s Automated Vehicles Encounter a Hitch — Humans!

As per my last post, our law school problem solving class is looking at problems created by the interaction between connected and automated vehicles and other roadway users. This article from The Information offers some interesting insights on the difficulties Waymo is facing as it deploys its robo-taxi service in Phoenix.  Basically, the problem comes

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Problem Solving Class at Michigan Law Tackles Mixed Fleet Problems

This fall, the University of Michigan Law School is offering its third Problem Solving Initiative (“PSI”) course concerning connected and automated vehicles. The first class, offered in the Winter 2017 semester, involved a team of fifteen graduate students from law, business, engineering, and public policy who accepted the challenge of coming up with commercial use

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New technology, new business models and new ways of thinking

Transportation as we know it is changing dramatically.  New technology, new business models and new ways of thinking about how we move are being announced almost daily.  With all this change, come inevitable questions about legality, responsibility, and morality.  Lawyers and policy makers play a leading role in answering these challenging questions.  The newly launched Journal of Law and Mobility, will serve an important role as the leading source for scholarship, commentary, analysis, and information, and enable a meaningful dialogue on a range of mobility topics.

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Welcome to the Journal of Law and Mobility

I am delighted to welcome you to the newly launched Journal of Law and Mobility! The Journal is the centerpiece of the University of Michigan Law School’s new Project in Law and Mobility, which will work in partnership with Mcity and the wider University community to expand knowledge, communication, and learning about the intersection of law, regulation, and mobility. In addition to the Journal, the Project will include such features as a periodic speaker series, an annual conference, and support for our Problem Solving Initiative course in connected and automated vehicles.

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The Blog contains short posts by Journal of Law and Mobility editors, student staff members, and other guest bloggers concerning breaking news or other contemporary topics. 

 

Any opinions expressed are those of the individual author and not the University of Michigan, the Journal of Law and Mobility, or the Law and Mobility Program.

 

Outside blog post submissions (of 500-1,000 words) are always welcome. All submissions are evaluated for publication by our staff.