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E-Scooters on the Rise, But Not Without Challenges

One of the most persistent issues in public transportation is the so-called “last mile” problem. The essence of the problem is that, if the distance between the nearest transit stop and a rider’s home or office is too far to comfortably walk, potential riders will be more likely to drive than use public transit. The

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Quick Takeaways From a Few Weeks on Public Transit in Washington, D.C.

In my previous posts, I have written a lot about city design and integrating emerging forms of transit, primarily automated vehicles, into the transportation landscape of a city. I am spending this summer in Washington, DC, and am getting an up-close look at this city’s transit options. I left my car behind for the summer,

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Automated Vehicles Will Present New Challenges for Criminal Enforcement

As we move towards a future of fully automated vehicles, the types of crime – and attendant need for criminal enforcement – committed with cars is likely to evolve. As our transit system becomes more automated, the danger of a hack, and the difficulty of discovering the crime through ordinary policing tactics, is likely to

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Rush Delivery: Robots Take Over Sidewalks (Part 1 of 3)

All the way back in December, I wrote about how various companies, including Amazon (in partnership with Toyota), Postmates, Domino’s and Kroger were all working on using CAVs and drones to deliver goods to consumers. Since then there have been a number of news stories on similar projects across the globe, which deserve some attention,

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Beyond the Coasts: Is it Just “A Different Approach”?

Many have claimed that EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) would “kill AI”. Shortly after its entry into force at the end of May 2018, the New York Times was already carrying industry concerns: “the new European data privacy legislation is so stringent that it could kill off data-driven online services and chill innovations like

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Industry Efforts at Privacy Regulation

A couple weeks ago, I wrote a post outlining the fledgling legal efforts to address the increasingly urgent privacy concerns related to automated vehicles. While Europe’s General Data Privacy Regulation and California’s Consumer Privacy Act set a few standards to limit data sharing, the US as a whole has yet to seriously step into the

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CAVs Add New Urgency to Data Privacy Debate

For the past several months, this blog has primarily focused on new legal questions that will be raised by connected and automated vehicles. This new transportation technology will undoubtedly raise novel concerns around tort liability, traffic stops, and city design. Along with raising novel problems, CAVs will also add new urgency to longstanding legal challenges.

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Of Cops and Algorithms: A (Short) Waymo Story

With roughly a clip a month – most of these being corporate fluff – Waymo’s YouTube channel is not the most exciting nor informative one. At least, those (like me) who keep looking for clues about Waymo’s whereabouts should not expect anything to come out of there. That was until February 20th, when Waymo low-key

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Should Automated Vehicles Break The Law?

Earlier this month, the Journal of Law and Mobility hosted our first annual conference at the University of Michigan Law School. The event provided a great opportunity to convene some of the top minds working at the intersection of law and automated vehicles. What struck me most about the conference, put on by an organization

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The Trolley, And It’s Not A Problem

The “Trolley Problem” has been buzzing around for a while now, so much that it became the subject of large empirical studies which aimed at finding a solution to it that be as close to “our values” as possible, as more casually the subject of an episode of The Good Place. Could it be, however,

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The Problem of Algorithmic Bias in Autonomous Vehicles

The common story of automated vehicle safety is that by eliminating human error from the driving equation, cars will act more predictably, fewer crashes will occur, and lives will be saved. That future is still uncertain though. Questions still remain about whether CAVs will truly be safer drivers than humans in practice, and for whom

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Evolution of Tort Liability in Response to Autonomous Vehicles

In the coming decades, advancing technology is likely to strain many tried-and-true legal concepts.  The tort law cause of action for design defects is likely to be among the most impacted. This post will explore the current understanding of design defect claims, and highlight areas where autonomous vehicles and other highly complex technologies will likely

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Beyond the Coasts: Automated Brakes Standardization Trending Globally

The European Parliament, the deliberative institution of the European Union which also acts as a legislator in certain circumstances, approved on February 20, 2019 the European Commission’s proposal for a new Regulation on motor vehicle safety. The proposal is now set to move to the next step of the EU legislative process; once enacted, an

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Beyond the Coasts: Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi’s Waymo Deal Another Nudge Toward the Exit for Nissan?

The global automotive industry – and the world of global corporations – was shaken when Carlos Ghosn, Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi’s (“RNM”) CEO, was arrested by Japanese authorities for alleged multiple counts of financial misconduct at the end of November 2018. For those who had been following developments inside the RNM “alliance,” this apparently sudden crackdown came as

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Transit Equity in American Cities

After introducing a discussion of mobility justice last week, I planned to highlight a few cities that were doing particularly well at enabling transit equity across racial or economic lines in their cities. While I did not expect to find many cities excelling across the board, I hoped to find some places with best practices

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Ensuring Transportation for the Whole City

Whenever connected and autonomous vehicles are considered, some people envision a mobility paradise. They see current parking areas making way for more productive buildings or green space, pedestrians and cyclists sharing the roads with vehicles that can seamlessly respond to every move, and a dramatic decrease in traffic fatalities. Such visions are behind much of

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Privacy Isn’t Only About State Action

Americans have traditionally had an understandable skepticism towards government collection of our data and monitoring of our private communications. The uproar caused by the Snowden leaks in 2013 was followed by increased public attention to data privacy. In a 2014-15 survey, 57% of respondents said that government monitoring of the communications of US citizens was

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Are Voluntary Safety Standards the Way Forward for the CAV Industry?

Recently, I wrote about the prospects for federal legislation addressing connected and autonomous vehicles. While the subject will be taken up in the new Congress, the failed push for a bill at the end of 2018 is an indication of the steep hill any CAV legislation will have to overcome. Despite the lack of federal

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What Can be Done About Traffic Problems Caused by Rideshares?

No matter how you get to work, chances are you’ve spent at least a handful of hours frustrated by the commute. At some point, construction, poor weather, or simply congested roadways have taken valuable hours from all of our days. Given the constant annoyance of bad traffic, it is unsurprising that people get excited about

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Calls Grow for Nationwide Regulation of Connected and Autonomous Vehicles

To date, twenty-nine states have enacted legislation related to connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs). Eleven governors have issued executive orders designed to set guidelines for and promote the adoption of CAVs. In response to this patchwork of state laws, some experts have argued that the federal government should step in and create a uniform set

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Exploring Singapore’s Tight Vehicle Regulation

Welcome to 2019! Over the past several months, this page has focused a lot on deployment of connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs) in US cities. 2018 was indeed a big year for CAVs in the United States. The vehicles were deployed commercially in Arizona, California began to allow testing of the technology without a safety

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Don’t Forget to Tip Your (Robotic) Delivery Driver

This fall we’ve spent a fair amount of time talking about how connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) will change the structure of our cities, from the curb, to public transit, and beyond. In my last post before the holidays, I want to take a look at how CAVs could change the way goods are transported

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Tesla Autopilot Collides with the 4th Amendment

Guest Blog by Jesse Halfon Last month, two California Highway Patrol (CHP) officers made news following an arrest for drunk driving. What made the arrest unusual was that the officers initially observed the driver asleep behind the wheel while the car, a Tesla Model S, drove 70 mph on Autopilot, the vehicle’s semi-automated driving system.

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The Battle For the Curb

Recently, Kevin wrote about how CAVs could alter the shape of cities. While CAV deployment is still in its infancy, the boom in ride sharing is already changing the design of cities. In Washington,D.C. the city government has announced the creation of five pickup and drop off zones that are reserved for ride shares 24

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Integrating CAVs into Existing Public Transportation Infrastructure

I’ve written in recent weeks about the impact of autonomous vehicles on city design. Choices made by both city planners and CAV operators in the coming decades will play key roles in determining whether our new transportation paradigm is one of compact, walkable cityscapes that accommodate traffic of all sorts, or one that spurs increased

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California Takes the Leap on Driverless CAVs 

California has become the second state in the nation to permit connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) to operate on public roads without a safety driver. With the recent announcement that Waymo has obtained approval to test driverless CAVs in a handful of Northern California communities, the state joins Arizona on the leading edge of the

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Through the Woods: A Thanksgiving Round Up of Mobility Innovations

In the U.S., Thanksgiving represents the busiest travel period of the year, with AAA predicting that this year 54 million people will travel 50 miles or more before sitting down for turkey and stuffing. So how will CAVs and other mobility innovations change how we travel, not just at Thanksgiving, but yearlong? Lets take a look

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CAVs and the Traffic Stop

The traffic stop has long been a primary point of interaction between police and the community. As consent Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations into local police departments in Ferguson, Baltimore, and Chicago made clear in recent years, they are also a moment that is open to large-scale abuse. The rise of connected and autonomous vehicles

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CAVs, Big Data, and the Future of Urban Design

City design has long been shaped by modes of transportation. The transition is easy to spot as you move westward across America. Relatively compact eastern cities initially grew up in the 18th and 19th centuries, when people traveled by foot or by horse. Scattered across the plains, and particularly throughout the vast expanses of Texas

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The Blog contains short postings by Journal editors, student staff members, or other guest bloggers concerning breaking news or other contemporary topics. Any opinions expressed are those of the individual author and not the University of Michigan or the Journal.