Blog

Equity in Micromobility

Micromobility usage was at an all-time high before March 2020. The culmination of decades of growth and industry involvement in the United States resulted in nearly 350 million rides taken on shared bikes and scooters since 2010. The National Association of City Transportation Officials (NACTO) reported this astounding statistic in their Shared Micromobility in the

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The COVID Crisis and Micromobility

This blog post kicks off a month of coverage focused on micromobility – check back tomorrow for a new journal article on micromobility laws nationwide! A few weeks ago I wrote about how COVID-19 has disrupted the ridesharing industry, with Lyft and Uber struggling to find their place in our changing world. Those same disruptions

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Uber and Lyft to Remain Online in California, While Two Other Recent Cases Highlight Other Legal Issues for Uber

Last week I discussed the California Superior Court decision that ruled that under California law Uber and Lyft must classify their ridesharing drivers as employees, rather than independent contractors. In response to that ruling, both companies had threatened to shut down service across the state. Yesterday, an appeals court issued a stay on that ruling,

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California Court Case and COVID-19 Disrupt the Relationship Between Drivers and Ridesharing Services

This week a California Superior Court ruled that transportation network company (“TNC”) titans Uber and Lyft have to classify drivers as employees, rather than independent contractors. The suit, spearheaded by the state’s Attorney General, sought to bring the two ride-sharing companies into compliance with Assembly Bill 5 (“AB 5”), which reclassified an array of “gig

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Decreased Mobility

An IBM report released earlier this month revealed some significant changes in consumer sentiment and public willingness to use certain mobility methods as a result of COVID-19. The study polled more than 25,000 adults during the month of April. Of the respondents that regularly used buses, subways, or trains: 20 percent said they no longer

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Cities, Streets, and COVID-19

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues and our memories of the “before time” feel ever more distant, some have begun to wonder how this crisis and its aftermath could change how and where people live. Will people abandon expensive and dense major cities for smaller cities, suburbs or even small towns? On the one hand, I’ll

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COVID-19 and the Future of Mobility

For the past two years, the purpose of this blog and the Law and Mobility Program has been to peak around the corner and see what’s next. We have explored the legal and policy ramifications of emerging transportation technologies and tried to figure out how those technologies, be they automated vehicles, e-scooters, delivery drones, or

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Turtle Shuttles, Inching Their Way Forward To Commercial Deployment

Up to now, the way forward for roadways-based, commercial automated mobility remained somewhat of a mystery. Surely, we would not see AVs in the hand of individual owners anytime soon – too expensive. “Robotaxi” fleets commanded by the likes of Uber and Lyft seemed the most plausible option. There was, at least in appearance, a

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Road Safety and Society – Environmental Considerations

Last week, the United States declined to sign the “Stockholm Declaration,” an international agreement to set targets for reducing road fatalities. The reason given for not signing the declaration was the U.S.’s objection to items within the document that referenced climate change, equity, gender equality, and other issues. For context, here is the paragraph they

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Divergence in Capabilities, Distracted Driving, and Derelict Governance

The California DMV recently released several 2019 reports from companies piloting self-driving vehicles in California. Under state law, all companies actively testing autonomous vehicles on California public roads must disclose the number of miles driven and how often human drivers were required to retake control from the autonomous vehicle. Retaking control is known as “disengagement.”

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Federal Government Releases Tepid Automated Vehicles 4.0

In January of this year, the United States Department of Transportation and the National Science & Technology Council released Automated Vehicles 4.0: Ensuring American Leadership in Automated Vehicles Technologies (“AV 4.0”). The report is intended to act as a set of unifying principles across 38 federal departments, agencies, commissions, and Executive offices. It offers guidance

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Smart Cars, Safety and Affordability: A Chicken and Egg Problem

Cars are getting smarter and safer. And yet this new breed of automobile remains inaccessible to large parts of the consumer base due to high costs. Some of these costs are a natural result of technological advancements in the automobile industry. Others however may be a product of inefficient market dynamics among car manufacturers, insurers

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Arrival’s Electric Delivery Vans

The delivery industry is evolving in order to keep up with the rise of home delivery. Arrival, a startup company in the process of building electric delivery vans, plans to add new vehicles to the roads in the next few years. The company plans to offer vehicles with different battery capacities, but the current model

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Coronavirus is Affecting More than Just Physical Health

The past few weeks have shown the intricate connection that access to transportation has with human health and the global economy. The outbreak of Coronavirus in Wuhan China, leading to mass international transportation restrictions, is a case study in the effects that transportation has on our daily lives and on the global economy. Coronavirus Timeline

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Uniform Law Commission — Making Someone Other than the Driver Responsible

As I wrote about last time, the Uniform Law Commission recently passed the Uniform Automated Operation of Vehicles Act. Today, I want to focus on Sections 5, 6, and 7 of that Act, which are titled, respectively, “Vehicle Registration,” “Automated-Driving Provider,” and “Associated Automated Vehicle.” The three sections are meant to complement each other and

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You Have Heard of the Uniform Commercial Code — Here Comes the Uniform Automated Operation of Vehicles Act

The Uniform Law Commission (“ULC”) is a non-governmental body composed of state-selected lawyers who oversee the preparation of “Uniform Laws” to be proposed to the states for adoption. The group’s most well-known body of law will be familiar to any lawyer or law student who paid attention in first-year contracts: the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC).

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Skyryse Helicopters and a Glimpse into Urban Air Travel

Imagine that you and your friends go out for a night on the town. By the time you are well and tired, it seems as though everyone else simultaneously had the same idea. With everyone around you clamoring to call an Uber or Lyft, you and your friends take one look at the gridlocked streets

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Tesla’s Settlement with the State of Michigan

Tesla and the State of Michigan have settled Tesla’s constitutional challenge to Michigan’s refusal to grant Tesla’s request for a Class A license, which would have allowed Tesla to open a company-owned dealership in the state. The lawsuit, which was filed in federal court in the Western District of Michigan in 2016 and was scheduled to

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User Data, Privacy Concerns, and Transportation Tech

If there are any ideas that the internet believes to be the truth in this modern day in age, I think that the following would at least make the list: the government is likely watching you through the camera in your laptop, and Facebook’s algorithm may know you better than anyone else. While the internet

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No More Robotaxis? 2020, The Reality Check for OEMs

Several major OEMs have recently announced scaling back of their shared or automated mobility ventures. Ford and Volkswagen are giving up investments in “robotaxis” – the CEO of their software partner, Argo, was quoted saying he “hates the word” anyway – and similar services operated by German automakers are withdrawing from various markets or shutting

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Cargo Bikes in NYC

These past few weeks millions of people went online, added various items to their cart, and hit “submit order.” From Thanksgiving until the end of December, the volume of packages hitting the road will be substantial. With Black Friday, Cyber Monday, and holiday shopping all taking place in a short time span, the resulting packages

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Mobility and Cybersecurity

Over the last few years, emerging mobility technologies from CAVs to e-scooters have become the targets of malicious hackers. CAVs, for example, are complicated machines with many different components, which opens up many avenues for attack. Hackers can reprogram key fobs and keyless ignition systems. Fleet management software used worldwide can be used to kill

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Talking Cars, the FCC, and a Battle for Bandwidth

Last month FCC Chairman Ajit Pai announced a plan to allow unlicensed use of a 45-megahertz (MHz) chunk of the mid-band spectrum. How is this even close to related to mobility or transportation? In 1999, the FCC dedicated 75 MHz of the 5.9GHz band to vehicle-related communications and transportation safety, specifically to dedicated short-range communications

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Do You Need a Cybertruck?

When Elon Musk unveiled the Cybertruck late last month, it sent shockwaves throughout the electric vehicle world, the stock market, and the internet. The sleek bodied, sharp-edged vehicle is reminiscent of the classic Back to the Future DeLorean. It has already been pre-ordered by over 200K customers, according to a tweet by Elon Musk. (It

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Connecticut Governor’s New Plan Shows the Many Roles States Play in Transportation

Earlier this month, Connecticut’s Governor Ned Lamont announced and released the details of his plan to upgrade and “transform” the state’s transportation system. The plan, Connecticut 2030 (CT2030), allocates $21 billion primarily to improving Connecticut’s highways, airports, mass transit, and ports and is pitched as “what Connecticut families and employers deserve.” While that is a

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How Much Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Do We Need?

Regardless of the mixed reactions to Tesla’s new Cybertruck, the electric vehicle revolution is here. Some analysts have predicted that within twenty years, half of new vehicles sold will be electric. For the future of the planet, we may need them to be. One core tenet of climate change mitigation is fairly simple in concept,

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Go Fast and Break People

On November 19, the NTSB held a public board meeting on the 2018 Uber accident in Tempe, Arizona, involving an “automated” (actually level 3) Uber-operated Volvo SUV. One woman, Elaine Herzberg, a pedestrian, died in the accident. In the wake of the report, it is now a good time to come back to level 3

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Pentagon Takes a Stab At Machine Morality, What’s New?

An important development in artificial intelligence space occurred last month with the Pentagon’s Defense Innovation Board releasing draft recommendations [PDF] on the ethical use of AI by the Department of Defense. The recommendations if adopted are expected to “help guide, inform, and inculcate the ethical and responsible use of AI – in both combat and

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Autonomous Ships and the Future of the Shipping Industry

Developments in technology have led to an increased reliance on artificial intelligence and autonomy in various vehicles such as cars, planes, helicopters and trains. The latest vehicles to implement autonomous technology into their operations are shipping vessels. Autonomous ships will transform the industry and current regulations are being reassessed to determine the best way to

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Platooning: Uncertain Obstacles (Part 2 of 2)

Last time I wrote about platooning, and the potential economic savings that could benefit the commercial trucking sector if heavy duty trucks were to implement the technology. This week, I’m writing about one of the current barriers to implementing platooning both as a commercial method, and in the larger scheme of highway driving. One of

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Information Sharing in the Space Industry

On April 8, 2019, it was announced at the 35th Space Symposium in Colorado Springs, Colorado that the space industry was getting an Information Sharing and Analysis Center (ISAC). Kratos Defense & Security Solutions, “as a service to the industry and with the support of the U.S. Government,” was the first founding member of the

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The Rise of Commercial Space Flight and the Private Space Industry

Nowadays it seems like everyone wants to get in on the rapidly-growing commercial space industry, reportedly worth approximately $340 billion per year. From Stratolaunch Systems’ “world’s largest plane, which acts as a launch pad in the sky,” to NASA’s Space Act Agreements (SAA) with Boeing and SpaceX for taxi services to and from the International

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Platooning: No Truck Left Behind (Part 1 of 2)

One of the most exciting and economically advantageous aspects of autonomous vehicle technology is the ability for cars and heavy trucks to “platoon.” Platooning is a driver-assist technology that allows vehicles to travel in tandem, maintaining a close, constant distance. Imagine trucks are racers in a bicycle or foot race. By drafting closely behind one

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Filling Micro-Mobility Gaps: Mopeds as the Medium Range Solution

2018 was the year of the electric scooter. They appeared unexpectedly, lined up on sidewalks, often without enough time for city regulators and officials to prepare for their arrival. Their spontaneous presence and practically unregulated use provoked outrage from consumers, city councils, and sidewalk users everywhere. If 2018 was the year of the electric scooter,

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Will You Need Insurance for Your AV?

Earlier this week, Raphaël wrote about the role for no-fault insurance in an age of automated vehicles. The post raised several important questions about the future of the auto insurance industry as technology advances: Who do we want to protect? Passengers, for sure. But drivers? There is no driver! Or rather, there are many drivers.

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AVs and Insurance: Is There A Purpose For No-Fault Without A Driver?

In a recent article published on Reuters Regulatory Intelligence, a DC-area lawyer said the following regarding the potential of implementing no-fault insurance “to” automated vehicles: “Drivers have an inherent incentive to drive safely, so as not to be injured or killed on the roadways. That inherent incentive is what mitigates the “moral hazard” of a

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October 2019 Mobility Grab Bag

October 2019 Mobility Grab Bag Every month brings new developments in mobility, so let’s take a minute to breakdown a few recent developments that touch on issues we’ve previously discussed in the blog: New AV Deployments This month saw a test deployment of Level 4 vehicles in London, which even allowed members of the public

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Road Rage Meets Robot Rage

While AVs have a lot of technological leaps to make before widespread deployment, developers and governments alike also need to also consider the human factors involved, including good old fashioned human fear. Earlier this year, a AAA study showed that almost three out of four (71%) Americans are afraid to ride in an AV. This

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The More Data, The Merrier? Sidewalk Labs May Be Sidelined in Toronto

In 2015, Google’s parent, Alphabet, decided the time was ripe for establishing a subsidiary in charge of investing in “smart infrastructure” projects – from waste to transport and energy. Its aim was specifically to implement such projects, transforming our urban landscape into a realm of dynamic and connected infrastructure pieces. Fast forward two years, and

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When Technology is Unpredictable, Can Regulators Keep Up?

I recently wrote about a renewed federal push to regulate automated vehicles. I’ve previously highlighted a range of state regulatory schemes, including California’s relatively strict set of regulations. Meanwhile, the advent of truly automated vehicles, which seemed imminent when Waymo announced its driverless shuttle service in Phoenix, now may be farther away than we expected.

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Will You Have Right to Repair Your CAV?

The European Union recently adopted new rules to help consumers repair household appliances like refrigerators and televisions. The rules require manufacturers to provide spare parts for years after sale – the number of years depending on the device. The “Ecodesign Directive” is intended to help protect the environment by extending the life of consumer appliances.

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Rush Delivery: On The Road (Part 3 of 3)

Last week I covered the various companies who are seeking to use aerial drones to deliver goods to your door. Today, in the third part to my series on delivery (you’ll find Part 1 here, and an even earlier post on delivery, from December of 2018, here), I’m going to look at recent proposals to

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Rush Delivery: In The Air (Part 2 of 3)

This is the much-delayed second part in a series of posts I started earlier this year. In that first post I discussed how companies are experimenting with small delivery robots that crawl along sidewalks to deliver goods right to your door. However, the sidewalk is not the only place where delivery drones may soon be

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Montréal’s soon-to-be-short-lived experiment with scooters?

Anyone currently living in a large city or an American college town has had some experiences with scooters – would that be the mere annoyance of having them zip around on sidewalks. Or, as a friend of mine did, attempt to use one without checking first where the throttle is… Montréal, the economic and cultural

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Congress Goes Back In On AV Legislation

Back in January, I wrote about the auto industry’s growing sense that a set of nationwide regulatory standards was needed to govern automated vehicles (AVs). To date, twenty-nine states and Washington, DC have enacted AV-related legislation. A handful more have adopted Executive Orders or developed some other form of AV regulation. As the number of

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AV Safety at the UN: Why Does It Matter?

I previously blogged on automated emergency braking (AEB) standardization taking place at the World Forum for Harmonization of Vehicle Regulations (also known as WP.29), a UN working group tasked with managing a few international conventions on the topic, including the 1958 Agreement on wheeled vehicles standards. It turns out the World Forum recently published the

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Reconsidering Safety Metrics Before Software Hits the Road

“Safety.” A single word that goes hand-in-hand (and rhymes!) with CAV. If much has been said and written about CAV safety already (including on this very blog, here and there,) two things are certain: while human drivers seem relatively safe – when considering the number of fatalities per mile driven – there are still too

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Beyond the Coasts: 5G or Wi-Fi? V2V Standardization in Action

A European Commission plan to implement the connected car-specific 802.11p “Wi-Fi” standard for vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication was scrapped early July after a committee of the Council of the European Union (which formally represents individual member states’ during the legislative process) rejected it. The standard, also known as ITS-G5 in the EU, operates in the same

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E-Scooters on the Rise, But Not Without Challenges

One of the most persistent issues in public transportation is the so-called “last mile” problem. The essence of the problem is that, if the distance between the nearest transit stop and a rider’s home or office is too far to comfortably walk, potential riders will be more likely to drive than use public transit. The

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Quick Takeaways From a Few Weeks on Public Transit in Washington, D.C.

In my previous posts, I have written a lot about city design and integrating emerging forms of transit, primarily automated vehicles, into the transportation landscape of a city. I am spending this summer in Washington, DC, and am getting an up-close look at this city’s transit options. I left my car behind for the summer,

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Automated Vehicles Will Present New Challenges for Criminal Enforcement

As we move towards a future of fully automated vehicles, the types of crime – and attendant need for criminal enforcement – committed with cars is likely to evolve. As our transit system becomes more automated, the danger of a hack, and the difficulty of discovering the crime through ordinary policing tactics, is likely to

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Rush Delivery: Robots Take Over Sidewalks (Part 1 of 3)

All the way back in December, I wrote about how various companies, including Amazon (in partnership with Toyota), Postmates, Domino’s and Kroger were all working on using CAVs and drones to deliver goods to consumers. Since then there have been a number of news stories on similar projects across the globe, which deserve some attention,

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Beyond the Coasts: Is it Just “A Different Approach”?

Many have claimed that EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) would “kill AI”. Shortly after its entry into force at the end of May 2018, the New York Times was already carrying industry concerns: “the new European data privacy legislation is so stringent that it could kill off data-driven online services and chill innovations like

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Industry Efforts at Privacy Regulation

A couple weeks ago, I wrote a post outlining the fledgling legal efforts to address the increasingly urgent privacy concerns related to automated vehicles. While Europe’s General Data Privacy Regulation and California’s Consumer Privacy Act set a few standards to limit data sharing, the US as a whole has yet to seriously step into the

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CAVs Add New Urgency to Data Privacy Debate

For the past several months, this blog has primarily focused on new legal questions that will be raised by connected and automated vehicles. This new transportation technology will undoubtedly raise novel concerns around tort liability, traffic stops, and city design. Along with raising novel problems, CAVs will also add new urgency to longstanding legal challenges.

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Of Cops and Algorithms: A (Short) Waymo Story

With roughly a clip a month – most of these being corporate fluff – Waymo’s YouTube channel is not the most exciting nor informative one. At least, those (like me) who keep looking for clues about Waymo’s whereabouts should not expect anything to come out of there. That was until February 20th, when Waymo low-key

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Should Automated Vehicles Break The Law?

Earlier this month, the Journal of Law and Mobility hosted our first annual conference at the University of Michigan Law School. The event provided a great opportunity to convene some of the top minds working at the intersection of law and automated vehicles. What struck me most about the conference, put on by an organization

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The Trolley, And It’s Not A Problem

The “Trolley Problem” has been buzzing around for a while now, so much that it became the subject of large empirical studies which aimed at finding a solution to it that be as close to “our values” as possible, as more casually the subject of an episode of The Good Place. Could it be, however,

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The Problem of Algorithmic Bias in Autonomous Vehicles

The common story of automated vehicle safety is that by eliminating human error from the driving equation, cars will act more predictably, fewer crashes will occur, and lives will be saved. That future is still uncertain though. Questions still remain about whether CAVs will truly be safer drivers than humans in practice, and for whom

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Evolution of Tort Liability in Response to Autonomous Vehicles

In the coming decades, advancing technology is likely to strain many tried-and-true legal concepts.  The tort law cause of action for design defects is likely to be among the most impacted. This post will explore the current understanding of design defect claims, and highlight areas where autonomous vehicles and other highly complex technologies will likely

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Beyond the Coasts: Automated Brakes Standardization Trending Globally

The European Parliament, the deliberative institution of the European Union which also acts as a legislator in certain circumstances, approved on February 20, 2019 the European Commission’s proposal for a new Regulation on motor vehicle safety. The proposal is now set to move to the next step of the EU legislative process; once enacted, an

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Beyond the Coasts: Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi’s Waymo Deal Another Nudge Toward the Exit for Nissan?

The global automotive industry – and the world of global corporations – was shaken when Carlos Ghosn, Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi’s (“RNM”) CEO, was arrested by Japanese authorities for alleged multiple counts of financial misconduct at the end of November 2018. For those who had been following developments inside the RNM “alliance,” this apparently sudden crackdown came as

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Transit Equity in American Cities

After introducing a discussion of mobility justice last week, I planned to highlight a few cities that were doing particularly well at enabling transit equity across racial or economic lines in their cities. While I did not expect to find many cities excelling across the board, I hoped to find some places with best practices

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Ensuring Transportation for the Whole City

Whenever connected and autonomous vehicles are considered, some people envision a mobility paradise. They see current parking areas making way for more productive buildings or green space, pedestrians and cyclists sharing the roads with vehicles that can seamlessly respond to every move, and a dramatic decrease in traffic fatalities. Such visions are behind much of

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Privacy Isn’t Only About State Action

Americans have traditionally had an understandable skepticism towards government collection of our data and monitoring of our private communications. The uproar caused by the Snowden leaks in 2013 was followed by increased public attention to data privacy. In a 2014-15 survey, 57% of respondents said that government monitoring of the communications of US citizens was

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Are Voluntary Safety Standards the Way Forward for the CAV Industry?

Recently, I wrote about the prospects for federal legislation addressing connected and autonomous vehicles. While the subject will be taken up in the new Congress, the failed push for a bill at the end of 2018 is an indication of the steep hill any CAV legislation will have to overcome. Despite the lack of federal

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What Can be Done About Traffic Problems Caused by Rideshares?

No matter how you get to work, chances are you’ve spent at least a handful of hours frustrated by the commute. At some point, construction, poor weather, or simply congested roadways have taken valuable hours from all of our days. Given the constant annoyance of bad traffic, it is unsurprising that people get excited about

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Calls Grow for Nationwide Regulation of Connected and Autonomous Vehicles

To date, twenty-nine states have enacted legislation related to connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs). Eleven governors have issued executive orders designed to set guidelines for and promote the adoption of CAVs. In response to this patchwork of state laws, some experts have argued that the federal government should step in and create a uniform set

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Exploring Singapore’s Tight Vehicle Regulation

Welcome to 2019! Over the past several months, this page has focused a lot on deployment of connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs) in US cities. 2018 was indeed a big year for CAVs in the United States. The vehicles were deployed commercially in Arizona, California began to allow testing of the technology without a safety

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Don’t Forget to Tip Your (Robotic) Delivery Driver

This fall we’ve spent a fair amount of time talking about how connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) will change the structure of our cities, from the curb, to public transit, and beyond. In my last post before the holidays, I want to take a look at how CAVs could change the way goods are transported

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Tesla Autopilot Collides with the 4th Amendment

Guest Blog by Jesse Halfon Last month, two California Highway Patrol (CHP) officers made news following an arrest for drunk driving. What made the arrest unusual was that the officers initially observed the driver asleep behind the wheel while the car, a Tesla Model S, drove 70 mph on Autopilot, the vehicle’s semi-automated driving system.

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The Battle For the Curb

Recently, Kevin wrote about how CAVs could alter the shape of cities. While CAV deployment is still in its infancy, the boom in ride sharing is already changing the design of cities. In Washington,D.C. the city government has announced the creation of five pickup and drop off zones that are reserved for ride shares 24

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Integrating CAVs into Existing Public Transportation Infrastructure

I’ve written in recent weeks about the impact of autonomous vehicles on city design. Choices made by both city planners and CAV operators in the coming decades will play key roles in determining whether our new transportation paradigm is one of compact, walkable cityscapes that accommodate traffic of all sorts, or one that spurs increased

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California Takes the Leap on Driverless CAVs 

California has become the second state in the nation to permit connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) to operate on public roads without a safety driver. With the recent announcement that Waymo has obtained approval to test driverless CAVs in a handful of Northern California communities, the state joins Arizona on the leading edge of the

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Through the Woods: A Thanksgiving Round Up of Mobility Innovations

In the U.S., Thanksgiving represents the busiest travel period of the year, with AAA predicting that this year 54 million people will travel 50 miles or more before sitting down for turkey and stuffing. So how will CAVs and other mobility innovations change how we travel, not just at Thanksgiving, but yearlong? Lets take a look

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CAVs and the Traffic Stop

The traffic stop has long been a primary point of interaction between police and the community. As consent Department of Justice (DOJ) investigations into local police departments in Ferguson, Baltimore, and Chicago made clear in recent years, they are also a moment that is open to large-scale abuse. The rise of connected and autonomous vehicles

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CAVs, Big Data, and the Future of Urban Design

City design has long been shaped by modes of transportation. The transition is easy to spot as you move westward across America. Relatively compact eastern cities initially grew up in the 18th and 19th centuries, when people traveled by foot or by horse. Scattered across the plains, and particularly throughout the vast expanses of Texas

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How Will CAVs Change the Shape of Our Cities?

The rapidly approaching deployment of commercially available CAVs has led city planners to begin grappling with the ways in which this new technology is expected to shape our built environment.  A 2017 report from MIT’s Urban Economics Lab and Center for Real Estate, financed by Capital One, explores potential real estate changes driven by CAVs.

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What Recent Stories on Google and GM Data Collection Mean for CAVs

Two recent news stories build interestingly on my recent blog post about CAVs and privacy. The first, from Forbes, detailing law enforcement use of “reverse location” orders, where by investigators can obtain from Google information on all Google users in a given location at a given time. This would allow, for example, police to obtain

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Arizona’s Regulatory Approach to be Tested as Waymo Prepares for Commercial Rollout of CAVs

By the end of this year, Alphabet subsidiary Waymo plans to launch one of the nation’s first commercial driverless taxi services in Phoenix, Arizona. As preparations move forward, there has been increasing attention focused on Arizona’s regulatory scheme regarding connected and automated vehicles (CAVs), and the ongoing debate over whether and how their deployment should

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CAVs and the New Push for Privacy Regulation

For many people, syncing their phone to their car is a convenience – allowing them to make hands-free calls or connect to media on their phone through the car’s infotainment system. But doing so can leave a lot of data on the car’s hardware, even after a user believes they have deleted such data. That

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Will the Automated Vehicle Revolution be Green?

Last week’s release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) special report highlights the “rapid and far-reaching” societal transformations required in order to limit warming to 1.5, or even 2 degrees Celsius. A new study by researchers at the University of Michigan, published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology, highlights the role of

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Getting on the Road

Hello! My name is Ian Williams, and I am the Managing Editor of the Journal of Law and Mobility. I wanted to take a moment to introduce myself, and give a brief preview of what to expect from the Journal in the coming weeks and months. As Managing Editor my job is to keep the

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Waymo’s Automated Vehicles Encounter a Hitch — Humans!

As per my last post, our law school problem solving class is looking at problems created by the interaction between connected and automated vehicles and other roadway users. This article from The Information offers some interesting insights on the difficulties Waymo is facing as it deploys its robo-taxi service in Phoenix.  Basically, the problem comes

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Problem Solving Class at Michigan Law Tackles Mixed Fleet Problems

This fall, the University of Michigan Law School is offering its third Problem Solving Initiative (“PSI”) course concerning connected and automated vehicles. The first class, offered in the Winter 2017 semester, involved a team of fifteen graduate students from law, business, engineering, and public policy who accepted the challenge of coming up with commercial use

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New technology, new business models and new ways of thinking

Transportation as we know it is changing dramatically.  New technology, new business models and new ways of thinking about how we move are being announced almost daily.  With all this change, come inevitable questions about legality, responsibility, and morality.  Lawyers and policy makers play a leading role in answering these challenging questions.  The newly launched Journal of Law and Mobility, will serve an important role as the leading source for scholarship, commentary, analysis, and information, and enable a meaningful dialogue on a range of mobility topics.

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Welcome to the Journal of Law and Mobility

I am delighted to welcome you to the newly launched Journal of Law and Mobility! The Journal is the centerpiece of the University of Michigan Law School’s new Project in Law and Mobility, which will work in partnership with Mcity and the wider University community to expand knowledge, communication, and learning about the intersection of law, regulation, and mobility. In addition to the Journal, the Project will include such features as a periodic speaker series, an annual conference, and support for our Problem Solving Initiative course in connected and automated vehicles.

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The Blog contains short posts by Journal of Law and Mobility editors, student staff members, and other guest bloggers concerning breaking news or other contemporary topics. 

 

Any opinions expressed are those of the individual author and not the University of Michigan, the Journal of Law and Mobility, or the Law and Mobility Program.

 

Outside blog post submissions (of 500-1,000 words) are always welcome. All submissions are evaluated for publication by our staff.